Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Think Blue Marin’ Category

The rain that fell last week on the Mt. Tamalpais Watershed measured 0.21 inches, bringing total rainfall to date (July 1-September 21) to 0.25 inches. While the small amount of rain was enough to be measured and to help settle the dust, it did not contribute to higher reservoir levels.

Here are the current water statistics:

Reservoir Levels: As of September 21, reservoir storage is 51,662 acre-feet,* or 65% of capacity. The average for this date is 55,148 acre-feet, or 69% of capacity. Total capacity is 79,566 acre-feet.

Rainfall: Rainfall this year to date (July 1-September 21) is 0.25 inches. Average for the same period is 0.52 inches.

Water Use: Water use for the week of September 15-21 averaged 25.19 million gallons per day, compared to 30.06 million gallons per day for the same week last year.

Creek Releases: During the month of August 2014 MMWD released 164 million gallons, or a total of 504 acre-feet, into Lagunitas and Walker creeks in west Marin for habitat enhancement.

Water use and reservoir figures are updated weekly and can be found on our Water Watch page.

*One acre-foot is 325,851 gallons

Read Full Post »

As founder and executive director of Cool the Earth, Carleen Cullen knows it is important to “walk the walk” at home. She and her family have solar panels on their rooftop, drive an electric vehicle that is 100% powered by the sun, and had reduced their indoor water use. In fact, their water use was below average in every month—except for summertime. Carleen described their summer water bill as “our guilty secret.”

Cullen yard

The Cullen family’s new yard

But not anymore. Carleen and her family recognized that the culprit behind their high summer water use was what was going on outdoors. Keeping their yard and garden green was making their household less green. As part of a yard renovation, they got rid of their lawn and installed artificial grass (made partly from recycled product), replaced high-water-use plants with California native drought-tolerant ones, and abandoned their old irrigation system in favor of a new drip system. Carleen also asked her kids to stop washing the car with the hose and switched to a waterless car wash method.

When Carleen opened their most recent water bill, she found for the first time that they were below average in the summer. Her family’s consumption went from 25,000 gallons last year to just under 15,000 gallons for the same period this year. By saving water they are saving energy, and as an added bonus they are saving money, too—their “guilty secret” summer bill plunged from $367 to just $100!

 

Are you an MMWD customer with a conservation success story to share? Tell us in the comments below, or email us and we may share your story on our blog.

Read Full Post »

Goats on Mt. Tamalpais

Goats on Mt. Tamalpais

As a direct response to the drought, the Marin Municipal Water District (MMWD) is dramatically increasing its efforts to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire in the communities adjacent to the Mt. Tamalpais Watershed by adding extra crews of people and, this year, goats. A 12-person crew began the first week of September and will continue working into October grooming the existing fuelbreaks bordering the communities of Fairfax, San Anselmo, Ross, Kentfield, and Mill Valley. The work is funded by an $80,000 drought relief grant from PG&E, with administrative support from FIRESafe MARIN.

Later in the fall, MMWD will also receive an additional $75,000 in fuel-load reduction work, courtesy of the Conservation Corps North Bay (CCNB). Funding for this work is part of a $678.4 million drought relief package approved by the state legislature. The CCNB crew will concentrate their work in the hills above Bon Tempe Reservoir where sudden oak death has negatively impacted forest health and increased the risk of wildfire.

In partnership with Marin County Parks, MMWD is conducting a six-week trial using a herd of 30 goats to reduce fire fuel loads in the hills above Deer Park in Fairfax. The trial period began the first week of September. The goats will be grazing native fuels and invasive weeds on both MMWD and Marin County Parks land. Staff will be monitoring the goats’ productivity rate, long-term ecological effects, and cost. The goal is to evaluate the role of goats in MMWD’s integrated pest management program.

Read Full Post »

MMWD reservoir levels are now 92% of average, which may be a surprise to many during this dry year. Our reservoir levels have actually held steady at this same ratio for several months now, thanks in part to customer conservation efforts and also to water system operational changes. The more water we can keep in the reservoirs now, the better off we are later.

Here are the current water statistics:

Reservoir Levels: As of August 25, reservoir storage is 53,843 acre-feet,* or 68% of capacity. The average for this date is 58,648 acre-feet, or 74% of capacity. Total capacity is 79,566 acre-feet.

Rainfall: Rainfall this year to date (July 1-August 25) is 0.04 inches. Average for the same period is 0.12 inches.

Water Use: Water use for the week of August18-25 averaged 27.32 million gallons per day, compared to 31.79 million gallons per day for the same week last year.

Supply Source: Last week we averaged 20.03 million gallons per day from our reservoirs and 7.29 million gallons per day from the Russian River.

Creek Releases: During the month of July 2014 MMWD released 171 million gallons, or a total of 524 acre-feet, into Lagunitas and Walker creeks in west Marin for habitat enhancement.

Water use and reservoir figures are updated weekly and can be found on our Water Watch page.

*One acre-foot is 325,851 gallons

Read Full Post »

In response to the continuing drought, the State Water Resources Control Board announced new emergency regulations in July designed to reduce outdoor water use statewide. To fully comply with the state, on August 19 the MMWD Board of Directors adopted an ordinance amending the water waste section of the district’s code.

Most of the new state regulations mirror water waste restrictions MMWD has had in place for some time. However, two changes may affect you: Irrigating between 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. is prohibited, as is using a hose without a shutoff nozzle. We’ve long recommended that our customers follow these water-saving practices; now, these recommendations are requirements.

We appreciate your cooperation!

Prohibited Water Uses

Under state and district water conservation regulations, the following are prohibited:

  • NEW: Irrigating between 9 a.m. – 7 p.m, except for system testing and repair
  • NEW: Using a hose without a shutoff nozzle
  • Allowing irrigation water to runoff or overspray the irrigated area
  • Hosing down sidewalks, driveways, and other hard-surfaced areas
  • Non-recirculating decorative fountains

FREE hose shutoff nozzles are available at MMWD’s Corte Madera office (one per household, please).

Read Full Post »

Save Your Green Save Our BlueMMWD is partnering with local retailers to help you give your garden a water-efficient makeover for less. For a limited time, participating businesses are generously offering coupons for a variety of water-conserving products for your landscape.

You’ll find discounts on smart irrigation controllers (which also may be eligible for a rebate from MMWD), mulch, drought-tolerant plants, drip irrigation supplies, and more. Each retailer has a different discount, so visit our website to browse the offers and print the coupons that best meet your needs. Or, drop by our lobby at 220 Nellen Avenue in Corte Madera to pick up some coupons and other water-saving information and gadgets.

Thank you to Fairfax Lumber & Hardware, Horizon, Marin Landscape Materials, Sonoma Compost, and The Urban Farmer Store for helping MMWD customers save water and money!

Read Full Post »

atrium watered with graywaterThe 50 or so plants in Maya M.’s beautiful atrium have never tasted pure drinking water. Instead, she keeps them happy and hydrated with buckets of lightly used water.

Though people often associate graywater with laundry-to-landscape or more elaborate, professionally installed systems, getting started with graywater can be as simple as buying a few good buckets. Graywater collected in a shower or bathroom sink bucket works well for toilet flushing and is fine for watering landscape plants and fruit trees. (Just be sure to choose a biodegradable soap, make sure graywater infiltrates into the soil and doesn’t pool or run off, and avoid letting graywater come into contact with any plant parts you plan to eat.)

In addition to being a proud member of the “bucket brigade,” Maya also is a big advocate of “stop the disposal” containers; since running the disposal uses a lot of water and energy, diverting fruit and vegetable trimmings to a handy juice container, lidded bowl, or basket and then to the compost pile is a simple way to save.

Maya learned the value of water growing up in the Netherlands during the war. When the bomb sirens sounded, the water and gas companies would at times turn off the utilities. Her job was to fill the bathtub so her family would have water during and after the air raids.

She still views water as most precious. She hand waters her garden to ensure plants get just what they need and is a proponent of saying goodbye to unwanted lawns. “To be green we have to love beige and let our lawns go dormant,” she says.

As her experience shows, being green also means loving gray.

Are you an MMWD customer with a conservation success story to share? Tell us in the comments below, or email us and we may share your story on our blog.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 108 other followers